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Why should you drive electric?

Benefits to Drivers

Performance

Any electric motor has more of something called torque, or tire-turning rotational force from the get-go than its equivalent internal combustion engine only counterpart. In addition to this 100% torque right off the line, most electrics also offer inherently better handling and ride due to their superior weight distribution and low center of gravity – A driving experience that hugs the corners! And finally, the ride is further improved by reduced overall cabin noise and less vibration.

Reliability

“EVs have 10-times fewer moving parts than a gasoline powered car,” says advocacy group Plug in America. This means lower maintenance requirements and fewer things that can mechanically wear out or fail, which results in higher long-term reliability. And because electric cars all have regenerative brakes, the brake pads and rotors don’t wear as quickly, and may even last the life of the vehicle with little or no maintenance. Read about the plug-in electric car with over 400,000 miles!

Convenience

An EV provides far greater convenience than the way we drive and fuel now. You charge an electric car like a cell phone —overnight, while you sleep. It’s sort of like having a gas pump in your garage, but without the mess. So, with an electric car you wake up back on “Full” and always ready to drive. And for many drivers, the car comes with all you need to get started, as charging can be done with the included adapter and a standard accessible outlet that most households already have in their garage or on the side of their house near a driveway.

Savings

Electric cars offer long term cost savings that often can’t be beat. In many cases, after federal, state and other incentives are factored in, this savings makes EV costs less total to own over five years than a comparable gasoline only vehicle This is in part because the average long-term price of electricity is less than half what gasoline would cost for the same driving, and also in part because of those far lower maintenance requirements (that also save you time as well).

Calculating Cost of Ownership

Below are examples of calculated cost of ownership over a 5 year period. These examples are based on 2018 average fuel and energy costs and 15k annual miles of driving. Actual costs will vary. How do you calculate the cost of ownership? The purchase price of an asset plus the costs of operation. When choosing among alternatives in a car-buying decision, buyers should look not just at an item’s short-term price, which is its purchase price, but also at its long-term price, which is its total cost of ownership.

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Benefits to Everyone

Domestic Reinvestment

Much of our oil used to make gasoline is still imported, as it is a global commodity. Money spent on electricity is not sent out of the country to foreign economies. This means that money instead stays in the domestic or even our local economy, which in turn equates to better local economic prospects for all, and also more local job creation.

Energy Security

Much of the global supply of oil also comes from unstable regions of the world, and/or from nations that our relationship is more adversarial than friendly. Our military must protect the global oil supply routes around the world at a cost of billions of dollars, not only for the regular security but also oil-related wars, sabotage and terrorism remains a threat in part due to oil-related geopolitical issues. Increased EVs adoption reduces this threat.

Human Health

Not to be confused with the environmental concerns that affect our planet, this is about public health issues and associated costs which affect us all. Switching to an electric car drastically reduces the pollution and other toxins from the drilling, transport, refining, and burning of petroleum. This is not only a societal concern for the well-being of everyone’s lungs, but also a financial concern as tailpipe and refinery emission related health problems have a hidden economic burden.

Climate Responsibility

As confirmed by peer-reviewed analysis, EVs already reduce CO2 emissions that contribute to Climate Change impacts caused by AWG (Anthropogenic, or man-made Global Warming) by at least 50% (Source: Union of Concerned Scientists), and by at least 70% with New England’s power mix.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. WILL IT GO ENOUGH MILES PER CHARGE FOR ME?

Absolutely! Whether you get a BEV (Battery Electric Vehicle which runs solely on electricity) or a PHEV (Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle; which runs on electricity first then seamlessly switches to a full tank of gasoline for longer distances and/or when the battery runs low), you’ll always have enough range!

Most BEVs have a range of between 114 – 315 miles depending on the model. Today’s BEVs have more range than 90% of commuters drive daily. They can be easily recharged overnight at home when you sleep, or at any time using the public fast charging station (which can often completely “refuel” the car in less than an hour!).

Today’s PHEVs typically have a battery range between 14 to 114 miles, and a full tank of gasoline range, 300 – 500+ miles. When operating in hybrid mode, they also get better gas mileage than comparable gasoline only vehicles.

Both types of EVs can be easily “refueled” at a variety of locations where you may already be planning to drive to and park at – home, work, grocery store parking lots, highway corridors, road trip lodgings and more!

The right EV for you will depend on how many miles you typically drive per day, if you plan to take long trips often, and how much passenger and cargo space you need. For a handy guide of online models, visit PlugStar’s Browse Electric Cars website.

2. HOW MUCH OF MY TIME WILL IT TAKE TO CHARGE?

It usually takes only around 5 seconds of your time to “refuel” your electric car. Why? Because most charging (over 85%, according to EV driver polling) happens at home, overnight, while the driver sleeps. You just plug in your car when you get home and it’s typically re-charged back to full before you even wake up the next morning. It’s the car that “refuels” while you sleep! In many cases, all you need is the included charging adapter and a standard outlet (also known as Level 1 charging) to recharge for the daily range you need – no “charging station” required! It really is that easy. Check out our Charging Guide section to learn about Charging Equipment, get Home Installation Help, and discover what Rebates and Incentives are available to lower the cost of purchase and installation.

The second most common place to charge is at the workplace. Since most people are at work for 7 or more hours, the time to charge is not a concern. The third most common charging happens at a place you can catch an “Opportunity Charge”: Typically, a shopping area, restaurant, or recreation destination where you’d already planned to visit for one or more hours. Already numbering in the tens of thousands, more Workplace Charging and Opportunity Charging sites are being added every year. These are usually what’s known as Level 2 charging sites which add 12 to 70 miles of range per hour, depending upon the vehicle and station type.

Finally, there are two options for taking your electric car on longer trips.

  • Choosing a PHEV (Plug in Hybrid Electric Vehicle) means you can drive and refuel on any trip just as you do now, conveniently at the next gas station rest stop. But you can still charge up as well, whenever it’s convenient to do so. It’s the best of both worlds, as you can still drive electric miles every day while take very long trips any day.
  • Choosing a BEV (Battery Electric Vehicle) means you’ll want to look for fast charging (also known as Level 3) along your route and/or overnight destination charging (such as hotels that have charging) where you’ll stay or use another family vehicle could be used or you plan your trips to look for fast chargers along the route. Today’s fast charging can add from 60 up to 180 miles of range in under 30 minutes, depending on model and station. Recently automakers are offering more and more higher range BEVs. Thousands of fast chargers and destination chargers are being added every year, and the next generation of fast charging coming in just a few years will add twice the range in half the time! To get a handy online map and mobile app to find charging station near you, visit PlugShare or install their mobile app.
3. WHAT WOULD MY COST TO BUY OR LEASE BE?

In Massachusetts, an electric car can be as affordable to buy or lease as a comparable car, thanks to state and federal incentives, combined with special local deals we can connect you with.

Massachusetts State Rebate. The Massachusetts Offers Rebates for Electric Vehicles (MOR-EV) Program helps MA consumers purchase or lease a new vehicle. Any Massachusetts resident is eligible for a rebate of up to $3,500 after the purchase or lease an eligible electric vehicle.

Federal EV Tax Credit. The federal government also offers a tax credit for qualifying electric vehicles and qualifying taxpayers. The federal EV tax credit may reduce your net cost by as much as an additional $7,500.

To learn more details about state and federal EV incentives, visit our vehicle Rebates and Incentives page.

Local group buy and dealer incentive programs. Additional local incentives can further lower monthly payment costs, sometimes to under $200 a month, with no money down. In some cases, combined incentives can mean up to $15,000 off MSRP. To learn more about how to take advantage of each of these rebates, incentives, and special offers, contact us.

4. HOW MUCH WOULD I BENEFIT IN FUEL AND MAINTENANCE SAVINGS?

An EV costs significantly less to own than its gasoline powered cousins over its lifetime –often thousands of dollars less! On average, it is far cheaper to “fuel” with electricity than gasoline, especially in areas served by a municipal electric utility! Electric cars also require far less regular maintenance, saving you hundreds more, with fewer to no oil changes, filters, belts, etc. Even the brakes last longer, thanks to something called regenerative braking!

How much you’ll save depends on your yearly mileage and selected vehicle. For a free assessment of you estimated personal cost savings, contact us!

5. CAN I EXPECT GOOD RELIABILITY FROM AN ELECTRIC CAR?

Electric cars often are more reliable than their gasoline only counterparts. EVs have fewer moving parts and require far less scheduled maintenance and have fewer mechanical systems to maintain or that could break down. They still require an annual safety inspection, but this only takes a minute, since there is no exhaust system to analyze.

6. WILL THE BATTERY PERFORM WELL FOR THE LIFE OF THE CAR?

Every new electric car’s battery carries a minimum replacement warranty of 8 years or 100,000 miles. Current plug-in electrics (BEVs and PHEVs) are already proving their real-world merit, performing well for hundreds of thousands of miles, and even going beyond the warranty period while showing very little to no noticeable loss of the original usable electric range.

7. DOES AN ELECTRIC CAR PROVIDE ME WITH ENOUGH DRIVING POWER?

The amount of sheer acceleration will vary from model to model, but the universal truth is than electric cars have more instant power off the line than a gasoline only equivalent – often 50% or more! This is because electric motors have more torque, or that get-up-and-go force.

To really experience first-hand the unique thrill of driving electric, attend one of our upcoming Ride & Drive EVents, or sign up for a no sales pressure test drives with one of our local EV Ambassadors!

8. IS AN ELECTRIC CAR AS SAFE AS THE CAR I DRIVE NOW?
Most electric cars have an overall 5-star crash safety rating from the NHTSA. Any high voltage wires are colored bright orange, and most manufacturers install battery kill switches in easily accessible locations on their vehicles. First responders regularly complete training on hybrid and electric vehicles to ensure they know how to handle them. While any vehicle contains a large amount of potentially hazardous and/or flammable energy in its “fuel” system, a typical gasoline only car has a greater amount of potential energy and higher volatility. In fact, a 2017 NHTSA study concluded the propensity and severity of fires and explosions from battery electric cars are “expected to be less because of the much smaller amounts of flammable solvent released and burning in a catastrophic failure situation.” (Lithium-ion Battery Safety Issues for Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles, NHTSA, 2017)
9. HOW MUCH LOWER ARE THE EMISSIONS FROM DRIVING AN ELECTRIC CAR?

According to EPA power plant data for New England electricity generation, driving electric already reduces carbon emissions by at least 70% versus driving a comparable gasoline only vehicle. Emissions impacts have also been assessed independently as significantly lower by several prominent institutions. To estimate the emissions equivalent of an EV charged where you live, try out this How Clean is Your Electric Vehicle tool provided by the Union of Concerned Scientists.

10. WHAT ARE THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS FROM MANUFACTURING AN ELECTRIC CAR AND ITS BATTERY?

The Union of Concerned Scientists concluded in its 2015 analysis that even accounting for the impacts of battery manufacturing, EVs already reduce life cycle emissions by at least 50%. While any manufactured product has a variety of potential environmental and social impacts, the batteries used in electric cars do not contain any toxic materials nor any rare-earth metals, and are increasingly being incorporated into end of automotive life reuse and/or recycling programs. In addition, automakers and battery manufacturers are increasing their supply chain diligence to ensure that battery raw materials are responsibly sourced from areas with ethical labor and environmental practices. Read more about the Responsible Minerals Initiative.